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  THE DAYS BETWEEN THE YEARS  
     
 

"A winner of a book with heart and soul, and with a revelation that carries its heroine homeward in joy."
– Dot Jackson, author of REFUGE

* * * * * *

In this comic yet deeply moving novel, filmmakers interview Mrs. Trixie Goforth for a documentary about her life during the Great Depression and World War II. They tell her she could leave no greater legacy than to share the way her everyday life—the days between her years—had been changed by her times. Memories start to flow, and she takes off on a journey that ends with news of a long-ago love and a renewed sense of profound wonder.

 
     
  WHERE THE WOODBINE TWINES  
     
 

"A damfine classy novella."
Fred Chappell, author of FAREWELL, I'M BOUND TO LEAVE YOU and LOOK BACK ALL THE GREEN VALLEY.

* * * * * *

"In this marvelous and mysterious novel, one unforgettable summer in a young girl's life becomes a cautionary tale for discerning truth and illusion, magic and metaphor. WHERE THE WOODBINE TWINES is a haunting coming-of-age novel that will stay with you long after you turn the final page."
Cassandra King, author of THE SUNDAY WIFE and THE SAME SWEET GIRLS

* * * * * *

When a troubled woman thinks she sees her long-lost childhood friend, it sets off a flood of memories about their bizarre last encounter and sparks her determination to find the answer to the question that has haunted her for years: Whatever became of the unforgettable Catherine Wiley?

Set in the legendary live oak gloom of the South Carolina lowcountry and the surreal carnival atmosphere of Myrtle Beach in the 1950s, this Southern Gothic tale of unsettling memories follows a twisting, tangled path to the gates of another fabled place—the place where the woodbine twines. . . .

 
 

 

 
  MARIAH OF THE SPIRITS  
     
 

"Austin has her own stories to tell, and every one is a gem, worthy of a long listen."
Rob Neufeld, Asheville Citizen-Times

* * * * * *

A ghost story, if it is nothing else, ought to be fun. It ought to make us feel the way we do when we see trees bent by the wind before a storm, hear the scuttle of dry leaves across a cobblestone walk, or drive a long, desolate stretch of swamp road where we've heard a mysterious hitchhiker walks on rainy nights. But a ghost story can be more than that. Good supernatural literature, said folklorist Dorothy Scarborough, gives us "entrance to immortal countries"...

 
Forthcoming
Spring 2006

 

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